Monday, December 04, 2017

OpenStack 12/04/2017 (p.m.)


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Sunday, December 03, 2017

OpenStack 12/03/2017 (p.m.)

  • Tags: internet, Russia, BRICs, DNS

    • The Russian government is reportedly considering building an “independent internet infrastructure” that it can use as an alternative to the global Domain Name System, or DNS system.

      Last month, Russia’s Security Council asked the government to start building a backup DNS system citing “the increased capabilities of Western nations to conduct offensive operations.”

    • However, some defense experts say the move could “have more to do with Moscow’s own plans for offensive cyber operations,” according to the Defense One website.

      The alternative DNS would also serve the so-called BRIC nations — Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa — and would operate independently of international organizations.

    • Russian president Vladimir Putin set a deadline of August 2018 to complete the infrastructure.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

OpenStack 11/29/2017 (p.m.)

  • Tags: net-neutrality, FCC, Comcast

    • For years, Comcast has been promising that it won't violate the principles of net neutrality, regardless of whether the government imposes any net neutrality rules. That meant that Comcast wouldn't block or throttle lawful Internet traffic and that it wouldn't create fast lanes in order to collect tolls from Web companies that want priority access over the Comcast network.

      This was one of the ways in which Comcast argued that the Federal Communications Commission should not reclassify broadband providers as common carriers, a designation that forces ISPs to treat customers fairly in other ways. The Title II common carrier classification that makes net neutrality rules enforceable isn't necessary because ISPs won't violate net neutrality principles anyway, Comcast and other ISPs have claimed.

      But with Republican Ajit Pai now in charge at the Federal Communications Commission, Comcast's stance has changed. While the company still says it won't block or throttle Internet content, it has dropped its promise about not instituting paid prioritization.

    • Instead, Comcast now vaguely says that it won't "discriminate against lawful content" or impose "anti-competitive paid prioritization." The change in wording suggests that Comcast may offer paid fast lanes to websites or other online services, such as video streaming providers, after Pai's FCC eliminates the net neutrality rules next month.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

OpenStack 11/29/2017 (a.m.)


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.