Thursday, July 24, 2014

OpenStack 07/25/2014 (a.m.)

  • INFORMATION FOR THE WORLD FROM OUTER SPACE Unrestricted, globally accessible, broadcast data. Quality content from all over the Internet. Available to all of humanity. For free. Through satellite data broadcasting, Outernet is able to bypass censorship, ensure privacy, and offer a universally-accessible information service at no cost to global citizens. It's the modern version of shortwave radio, or BitTorrent from space.

    Tags: ISP, satellite broadband, free, no-censorship

    • Right now, only 40% of humanity can connect to the Internet. Even less than that have access to truly free, uncensored Internet. What this represents is an enormous gap in access to information. While the Internet is an amazing communication tool, it is also the largest library ever constructed. It grants access to anything from books, videos, courseware, news, and weather, to open source farm equipment or instructions on how to treat infection or prevent HIV from spreading. #ImagineIf everyone could have that information for free?

      On August 11, 2014, Outernet will make that library available from space for free for the first time. Help us tell the world.

      #ImagineIf everyone had any information they wanted - what would that world look like? What new inventions would be created or diseases cured? What would people read about if their governments no longer deprived them of their right to free information? 

      Soon, we won't have to imagine.
    • Right now, only 40% of humanity can connect to the Internet. Even less than that have access to truly free, uncensored Internet. What this represents is an enormous gap in access to information. While the Internet is an amazing communication tool, it is also the largest library ever constructed. It grants access to anything from books, videos, courseware, news, and weather, to open source farm equipment or instructions on how to treat infection or prevent HIV from spreading. #ImagineIf everyone could have that information for free?

      On August 11, 2014, Outernet will make that library available from space for free for the first time. Help us tell the world.

      #ImagineIf everyone had any information they wanted - what would that world look like? What new inventions would be created or diseases cured? What would people read about if their governments no longer deprived them of their right to free information? 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Friday, July 18, 2014

OpenStack 07/18/2014 (p.m.)

  • Tags: surveillance state, NSA, nude-photos, LOVEINT, Snowden

    • Edward Snowden has revealed that he witnessed “numerous instances” of National Security Agency (NSA) employees passing around nude photos that were intercepted “in the course of their daily work.”

      In a 17-minute interview with The Guardian filmed at a Moscow hotel and published on Thursday, the NSA whistleblower addressed numerous points, noting that he could “live with” being sent to the US prison facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He also again dismissed any notion that he was a Russian spy or agent—calling those allegations “bullshit.”

      If Snowden’s allegations of sexual photo distribution are true, they would be consistent with what the NSA has already reported. In September 2013, in a letter from the NSA’s Inspector General Dr. George Ellard to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), the agency outlined a handful of instances during which NSA agents admitted that they had spied on their former love interests. This even spawned a nickname within the agency, LOVEINT—a riff on HUMINT (human intelligence) or SIGINT (signals intelligence).

    • “You've got young enlisted guys, 18 to 22 years old,” Snowden said. “They've suddenly been thrust into a position of extraordinary responsibility where they now have access to all of your private records. In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work in any sort of necessary sense. For example, an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising position. But they're extremely attractive.

      “So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and show their co-worker. The co-worker says: ‘Hey that's great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ And then Bill sends it to George and George sends it to Tom. And sooner or later this person's whole life has been seen by all of these other people. It's never reported. Nobody ever knows about it because the auditing of these systems is incredibly weak. The fact that your private images, records of your private lives, records of your intimate moments have been taken from your private communications stream from the intended recipient and given to the government without any specific authorization without any specific need is itself a violation of your rights. Why is that in a government database?”

      Then Alan Rusbridger, The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, asked: “You saw instances of that happening?”

      “Yeah,” Snowden responded.

      “Numerous?”

      “It's routine enough, depending on the company that you keep, it could be more or less frequent. These are seen as the fringe benefits of surveillance positions."


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

OpenStack 07/18/2014 (a.m.)

  • Tags: surveillance state, NSA, blowback, NSA-reform

    • Makes email “scary” in order to disrupt NSA surveillance

      Install

      Visit the Install ScareMail page to setup ScareMail on your preferred browser.

      Introduction

      ScareMail is a web browser extension that makes email “scary” in order to disrupt NSA surveillance. Extending Google’s Gmail, the work adds to every new email’s signature an algorithmically generated narrative containing a collection of probable NSA search terms. This “story” acts as a trap for NSA programs like PRISM and XKeyscore, forcing them to look at nonsense. Each email’s story is unique in an attempt to avoid automated filtering by NSA search systems.

      Demonstration Video

    • Want to grab some ScareMail text without using the browser extension? Use the ScareMail Generator to get all the scary text you want.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

OpenStack 07/16/2014 (p.m.)

  • Tags: surveillance state, GCHQ, dirty-tricks

    • The secretive British spy agency GCHQ has developed covert tools to seed the internet with false information, including the ability to manipulate the results of online polls, artificially inflate pageview counts on web sites, “amplif[y]” sanctioned messages on YouTube, and censor video content judged to be “extremist.” The capabilities, detailed in documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, even include an old standby for pre-adolescent prank callers everywhere: A way to connect two unsuspecting phone users together in a call.
    • he “tools” have been assigned boastful code names. They include invasive methods for online surveillance, as well as some of the very techniques that the U.S. and U.K. have harshly prosecuted young online activists for employing, including “distributed denial of service” attacks and “call bombing.” But they also describe previously unknown tactics for manipulating and distorting online political discourse and disseminating state propaganda, as well as the apparent ability to actively monitor Skype users in real-time—raising further questions about the extent of Microsoft’s cooperation with spy agencies or potential vulnerabilities in its Skype’s encryption. Here’s a list of how JTRIG describes its capabilities:

      • “Change outcome of online polls” (UNDERPASS)

      • “Mass delivery of email messaging to support an Information Operations campaign” (BADGER) and “mass delivery of SMS messages to support an Information Operations campaign” (WARPARTH)

      • “Disruption of video-based websites hosting extremist content through concerted target discovery and content removal.” (SILVERLORD)

    • • “Active skype capability. Provision of real time call records (SkypeOut and SkypetoSkype) and bidirectional instant messaging. Also contact lists.” (MINIATURE HERO)

      • “Find private photographs of targets on Facebook” (SPRING BISHOP)

      • “A tool that will permanently disable a target’s account on their computer” (ANGRY PIRATE)

      • “Ability to artificially increase traffic to a website” (GATEWAY) and “ability to inflate page views on websites” (SLIPSTREAM)

      • “Amplification of a given message, normally video, on popular multimedia websites (Youtube)” (GESTATOR)

      • “Targeted Denial Of Service against Web Servers” (PREDATORS FACE) and “Distributed denial of service using P2P. Built by ICTR, deployed by JTRIG” (ROLLING THUNDER)

    • • “A suite of tools for monitoring target use of the UK auction site eBay (www.ebay.co.uk)” (ELATE)

      • “Ability to spoof any email address and send email under that identity” (CHANGELING)

      • “For connecting two target phone together in a call” (IMPERIAL BARGE)

      While some of the tactics are described as “in development,” JTRIG touts “most” of them as “fully operational, tested and reliable.” It adds: “We only advertise tools here that are either ready to fire or very close to being ready.”


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Sunday, July 13, 2014

The US Supreme Court delivers some major whup-ass

Marbux has has been following closely the adventures of Über patriot Edward Snowden and his quest to free us from dark NSA overlords.  His latest analysis of Supreme Court rulings is cause for celebration.  First that the nations highest court has stood up for individual liberty and the Constitution.  And second, that it's great to have at the ready a legal beagle expert the likes of Marbux. Thank you Paul.

..................
Hi, Gary,

Riley v. California, 2014 U.S. LEXIS 4497, 59-60 (U.S. June 25, 2014),
<http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/13pdf/13-132_8l9c.pdf

>; also at
<http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=8269519941912537264>.

I suggest that you read pages 17-22, subsections 1. and 2. This is the most significant Supreme Court ruling from a civil liberty standpoint in several decades. But they got it right this time. I'd put this one above 8.6 on the Richter Scale, with utter devastation left in wide swaths of Washington, D.C. and surrounding suburbs. Undoubtedly there is a severe shortage of toilet paper in our nation's capitol.

The Riley decision has far more ramifications than searches of cellphones, which as a result of this decision now generally requires a judge-issued warrant based on particularized probable cause, absent exigent circumstances.

It's a straightforward civil libertarian's wet dream by a *unanimous* Supreme Court. The NSA's big case that all of its metadata search activities, the decades-old pen register case of Smith v. Maryland, has been construed narrowly in a way that confines it to the particular facts of its case. Any user-generated metadata in the mix, and it now requires a warrant. The so-called third-party doctrine is no longer with us in the digital age. (I called that one right; Smith would not control our privacy rights in the digital future.)

In subsection 2, they even took care of cloud computing, forcing a concession from the DoJ that a judge-issued warrant is necessary to files stored in the cloud.

And digital data of U.S. residents on computers is now for all practical purposes off-limits to law enforcement and (very likely to NSA) without a warrant or court order.

Digital data is now protected under the Fourth Amendment *because* cellphones are recognized as "minicomputers"(!!) with [i] very high data  storage capacity (defined as 16-64 GB); [ii] that commonly include nearly every private fact of a person's life, complete with history; and [iii] a complete record of a person's communications, photos, videos, contacts, etc. They came very close to saying that if it can be imagined, "there's an app for that". But closed by saying,
"Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple—get a warrant."

This decision does not completely tie the knot to subject NSA to the same restrictions as law enforcement. But the decision is clearly worded as a building block for such a holding in a later case. Two cases are now pending appeal in the Second and D.C. Circuits Courts of Appeals involving NSA telephone metadata. In the D.C. Circuit (Klayman case), the district court had declined to follow Smith v. Maryland and held that the NSA's FISA orders were no good; that the metadata collection required a judicial warrant. In the other case (ACLU case) the district court had held the precise opposite, that Smith v. Maryland was controlling and no warrant was required. My guess is that both of those appeals courts are now in a footrace to see who can publish their opinion first, relying on this new Supreme Court opinion and tying the knot around NSA's neck.

They also signaled that cellphone geolocation data is going to be subject to the warrant requirement by quoting a bit of Justice Sotomayor's concurrence in their U.S. v. Jones decision of 2012 (involved geolocation data), although they could not squarely hold that because no geolocation data was known to be at issue in this decision.

There was a concurrence by Justice Alito, writing to say that he would not have gone so far as the rest of them did on a minor point, then closed by saying:

"In light of these developments, it would  be very unfortunate if privacy protection in the 21st century were left primarily to the federal courts using the blunt instrument of the Fourth Amendment.  Legislatures, elected by the people, are in a better position than we are to assess and respond to the changes that have already occurred and those that almost certainly will take place in the future."

Significantly, no other justices joined in his concurrence, which I read as the rest of them saying, "we'll take care of this problem using the Fourth Amendment; Congress can do what it wants but we're taking care of this problem as a matter of constitutional law, so anything Congress does had better be more protective of privacy rights that what we say."

Perhaps most significantly, although his name is never mentioned, there is no doubt in my mind; Edward Snowden is the hero here. He created the necessary political climate by letting the Justices know that they too were being surveilled by NSA. Thankfully, the justices *all* rose to the occasion, signaling a new direction in U.S. constitutional law governing digital privacy rights (and relieving my fears that they would succumb to blackmail.)

The decision has already been followed by five district courts, with one being an epic opinion telling law enforcement precisely how many hoops they are going to have to jump through to get him to sign a warrant for the search of a cellphone. (Cluestick: it's more paperwork than anyone wants to do except in the rarest of vitally important cases, playing back all the procedures that have been developed by major corporate law firms to defend corporate computers from searches that have been implemented by the courts. So look out for cops asking
for consent to search your cellphone. Tell them that you object to any search of your cellphone; don't wait for them to ask.)

The decision was passed down on June 25. I apologize for not finding the time to read it until tonight. By now, they should be past the panic point at NSA and DoJ and moving on toward acceptance that a lot of their present intelligence and law enforcement practices are on the way out the door. Expect legislation in Congress very soon *after* the fall election.

This is the greatest defeat that America's Dark Government has yet encountered. The Supreme Court has just informed all judges in the U.S. that they are civil libertarians when it comes to government trespass upon Americans' digital privacy.

OpenStack 07/13/2014 (p.m.)


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Sunday, July 06, 2014

OpenStack 07/07/2014 (a.m.)

  • Tags: internet-balkanization, Russia, internet-censorship

    • (Reuters) - Russia's parliament passed a law on Friday to force Internet sites that store the personal data of Russian citizens to do so inside the country, a move the Kremlin says is for data protection but which critics see an attack on social networks.

      The law will mean that from 2016, all Internet companies will have to move Russian data onto servers based in Russia or face being blocked from the web. That would likely affect U.S.-based social networks such as Facebook, analysts say.

    • Putin, an ex-KGB officer who has called the Internet a "CIA project", denied he was restricting web freedoms, saying his main concern was protecting children from indecent content.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Friday, July 04, 2014

OpenStack 07/04/2014 (p.m.)

  • Tags: surveillance state, NSA-targets, Tor, Tails

      • Alleged leaked documents about the NSA's XKeyscore snooping software appear to show the paranoid agency is targeting Tor and Tails users, Linux Journal readers – and anyone else interested in online privacy.

        Apparently, this configuration file for XKeyscore is in the divulged data, which was obtained and studied by members of the Tor project and security specialists for German broadcasters NDR and WDR.

        In their analysis of the alleged top-secret documents, they claim the NSA is, among other things:

        • Specifically targeting Tor directory servers
        • Reading email contents for mentions of Tor bridges
        • Logging IP addresses used to search for privacy-focused websites and software
        • And possibly breaking international law in doing so.

        We already know from leaked Snowden documents that Western intelligence agents hate Tor for its anonymizing abilities. But what the aforementioned leaked source code, written in a rather strange custom language, shows is that not only is the NSA targeting the anonymizing network Tor specifically, it is also taking digital fingerprints of any netizens who are remotely interested in privacy.

    • These include readers of the Linux Journal site, anyone visiting the website for the Tor-powered Linux operating system Tails – described by the NSA as "a comsec mechanism advocated by extremists on extremist forums" – and anyone looking into combining Tails with the encryption tool Truecrypt.

      If something as innocuous as Linux Journal is on the NSA's hit list, it's a distinct possibility that El Reg is too, particularly in light of our recent exclusive report on GCHQ – which led to a Ministry of Defence advisor coming round our London office for a chat.

    • If you take even the slightest interest in online privacy or have Googled a Linux Journal article about a broken package, you are earmarked in an NSA database for further surveillance, according to these latest leaks.

      This is assuming the leaked file is genuine, of course.

      Other monitored sites, we're told, include HotSpotShield, FreeNet, Centurian, FreeProxies.org, MegaProxy, privacy.li and an anonymous email service called MixMinion. The IP address of computer users even looking at these sites is recorded and stored on the NSA's servers for further analysis, and it's up to the agency how long it keeps that data.

      The XKeyscore code, we're told, includes microplugins that target Tor servers in Germany, at MIT in the United States, in Sweden, in Austria, and in the Netherlands. In doing so it may not only fall foul of German law but also the US's Fourth Amendment.

    • The nine Tor directory servers receive especially close monitoring from the NSA's spying software, which states the "goal is to find potential Tor clients connecting to the Tor directory servers." Tor clients linking into the directory servers are also logged.

      "This shows that Tor is working well enough that Tor has become a target for the intelligence services," said Sebastian Hahn, who runs one of the key Tor servers. "For me this means that I will definitely go ahead with the project.”

    • While the German reporting team has published part of the XKeyscore scripting code, it doesn't say where it comes from. NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden would be a logical pick, but security experts are not so sure.

      "I do not believe that this came from the Snowden documents," said security guru Bruce Schneier. "I also don't believe the TAO catalog came from the Snowden documents. I think there's a second leaker out there."

      If so, the NSA is in for much more scrutiny than it ever expected.


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.