Monday, December 07, 2015

OpenStack 12/07/2015 (p.m.)

  • Tags: France, Tor, public-wifi-networks, blocking, legislation

    • After the recent Paris terror attacks, French law enforcement wants to have several powers added to a proposed law, including the move to forbid and block the use of the Tor anonymity network, according to an internal document from the Ministry of Interior seen by French newspaper Le Monde.

      That document talks about two proposed pieces of legislation, one around the state of emergency, and the other concerning counter-terrorism.

      Regarding the former, French law enforcement wish to “Forbid free and shared wi-fi connections” during a state of emergency. This comes from a police opinion included in the document: the reason being that it is apparently difficult to track individuals who use public wi-fi networks.

      As the latter, law enforcement would like “to block or forbid communications of the Tor network.” The legislation, according to Le Monde, could be presented as early as January 2016.

  • Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C.552a(e) "Each agency that maintains a system of rec­ords shall— ... "(7) maintain no record describing how any individual exercises rights guaranteed by the First Amendment unless expressly authorized by statute or by the individual about whom the record is maintained or unless pertinent to and within the scope of an authorized law enforcement activity"

    Tags: no_tag

    • The recent publication of a leaked video demonstrating American security firm Raytheon’s social media mining tool RIOT (Rapid Information Overlay Technology) has rightly incensed individuals and online privacy groups.

      In a nutshell, RIOT – already shared with US government and industry as part of a joint research and development effort in 2010 – uses social media traces to profile people’s activities, map their contacts, and predict their future activities.

      Yet the most surprising thing isn’t how RIOT works, but that the information it mines is what we’ve each already shared publicly.


Posted from Diigo. The rest of Open Web group favorite links are here.

Post a Comment